Week 2 (Jan. 18) REAL TIMES

“REAL” TIMES

SPATIAL VS. DURATIONAL TIMES

DISCUSSION: CELLPHONE INTERVENTION

PERISCOPE EXPERIMENT

FOR NEXT WEEK

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“LIVE” TIME

Apollo 11 (1969)

- feel of liveness, but nothing is happening
- interesting to consider in light of Warhol’s long films (Sleep, Empire 1963 etc)
- synchronized viewing – a planetary media situation

What kinds of perceptual experiences emerge during the viewing of long durations in which nothing seems to be happening?

Gillette & SchneiderWipe Cycle (1969)

- multiple times coexisting: mixes live CCTV feeds with manufactured (network television) time and prerecorded tapes
- visitors become part of the information

Oswald Store—November 22 1963 12:30 5:30 PM CST ABC WFAA CBS NBC (JFK) (1971)

- synchronization of three streams of live coverage following the shooting of John F. Kennedy (1963)
- the “tactility of time”: the perception of time passing is modulated by anticipation, dread, trauma, inertia: it becomes akin to a physical substance

Wolfgang Staehle—untitled (9/11) (2001): When art and event intersect.

Animal cams: Jelly Cam (and not JenniCam); Lion Cam; Giraffe Cam; Great Horned Owl Cam

Ferguson split-screens (2015)

SPATIAL TIME VS. DURATION

SPATIAL TIME = CLOCK time = QUANTITATIVE, MEASURABLE, HOMOGENEOUS, REGULAR. Think of temporal divisions (seconds, milliseconds, any division) like pearls on a string—each one occupying a discrete position, a separation that makes COMPARISON and ANALYSIS possible.

RATIONAL / ADMINISTRATED TIME: Melting of bells in Revolutionary France
—->COORDINATION, SYNCHRONIZATION (trains!), TRANSPORT, TRADE

e.g. the spatialized timelines of non-linear editing systems

DIVIDING TIME—Etienne-Jules Marey chronophotography – Muybridge

Time and Motion Studies (Fordism)

Q: Do you regularly wake up just before your alarm? (clock time is already ALIEN TIME)

DURATION = QUALITATIVE, CONTINUOUS, FLUX, NON-MEASURABLE, PROCESS, grasped through INTUITION.

Lived, experienced, embodied time.

Time stretches and compacts itself as a result of the interaction of external stimuli with internal states. As we have all experienced, time passes differently when in action than in repose.

In Bergson’s conception of time, nothing retains self-identity over time. Life is change itself. Due to the continuous INTERPENETRATION of temporal layers, it is impossible to nail down (spatialize) the boundaries of any particular duration.

MOVEMENT IMAGE vs. TIME IMAGE (Deleuze)

Christian Marclay—The Clock (2010)

another kind of real-time – clock time mirrored on screen through fictional materials

PARADOX: Submitting cinematic time to regulatory clock time.

PHENOMENAL TIME

Bruce Nauman—Elke, Allowing the Floor to Rise Up over Her, Face Up (1973) (TIME)

documenting processes, inertial activities where nothing is happening

the affordability of video makes conceptual experimentation possible

Bruce Nauman—Stamping in the Studio (1969) (MOVEMENT)

everyday activity

documenting a process / notebook

duration of shot = length of tape (1 hour) (materially constrained, like the Lumière’s early films)

Terry FoxChildren’s Tapes (1974)

INHUMAN TIME: DILATION

How does the perception of inhuman time warp the brain?

Douglas Gordon—24-hr psycho (1993)

appropriation: warps preexisting expectations – narrative dissolves in visual minutiae

Douglas Gordon – 5-Year Drive By (1995) = The Searchers stretched to the actual duration of the narrative (5 years it took for the protagonist to find his daughter).

Sharon Lockhart—Lunch Break (2008)

materiality of video becomes manifest

distance between still image and moving image — re. persistence of vision

each frame copied 8 times (from 24 frames/second to 3 frames/second), making the film essentially a succession of stills, with digitally smoothed over transitions between each “frame”: 14400 frames

Television Recuperation Unit (TRU)—ATPM TEST (1980s, realized 2016)

stretching time without altering pitch

NTSC (30 fps) —> PAL (25 fps) = 4% speedup

see also Drunk Trump compilation (2016)

INHUMAN TIME: COMPRESSION

Bill Viola—Ancient of Days (1979-81)

Multiple times coexisting: superimposed rates of change.

The Matrix: Bullet Time

A move from temporal to spatial logic.

Digitization collapses sound and visual material into information, with plastic potential.

stills converted into movie frames: the filmmakers are able, as Alexander Galloway puts it, “to freeze and rotate a scene within the stream of time,” and to view the scene, at each moment, from any desired angle

BUT, the bullet time of this scene is still inscribed into a linear, temporal narrative

Massive Attack / Édouard Salier—Splitting the Atom (2010)

doesn’t employ montage (moving the camera and fixing the world – the entire space is given in advance)

like the smooth space of the computer game in some way – though the music temporalizes it

Tony Scott—Domino (Bullet Time)

CSI “Demo” Time

The Pirate Cinema (Torrent Time)

the time of High Frequency Trading, algorithmic processes operating at speeds beyond human grasp

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DISCUSSION OF CELLPHONE CAPTURE INTERVENTION

Find an example online of an event captured by a phone which “changes the media story,” by giving the lie to an “official” media account.

PERISCOPE EXPERIMENT

1. Download Periscope. Create a Periscope account.

2. Pair up with a classmate. One of you will broadcast, and one of you will follow.

3. Choose a location somewhere in the Goldfarb building.

4. The broadcaster will lead the follower around. Both will be in close physical proximity. The broadcaster will attempt to spatially disorient the follower making it difficult to move through the “physical” space. The broadcaster will speak instructions as to how & where to move while consistently altering the orientation of the camera.

5. (Think of this as an example of being led around while blindfolded).

6. The follower will only use the phone screen as visual reference. Try and block out your peripheral vision as much as possible.

7. The follower will listen to the phone feed over headphones, blocking out as much as possible the sounds in the physical space.

8. Switch roles.

9. Return to classroom for discussion.

cf. Vito Acconci—Security Zone (1970)

FOR NEXT WEEK

1. FEEDBACK EXERCISE

a) Consider the many possible areas of human experience in which the concept of feedback has relevance. Make a list.

b) Describe a potential video project you might realize involving feedback (on multiple levels) and its creative uses.

2. Think of an everyday action that you have experience with that takes 30 seconds to accomplish.

3. As always, bring your phones and laptops…

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